RELATED ARTS

Art

art

Naomi Norman

Objectives

Kindergarten

Creating art has the unique ability to stimulate brain development. Art is a powerful carrier of information and influence. Children who are exposed at a young age to significant works of art are more likely to remain open minded, creative, and tolerant of the differences that make our country great. By discussing art from around the globe and across time, they will see the impact visual symbols have on individuals and cultures. Then as they create their own work, they too will be open to the exciting new possibilities of sharing their thoughts, feelings, and ideas.

The student artists will:
Adapt to Art in the Little Studio. This is different than art at home. Kindergartners have art twice on their art day. First they come for a 45 minute lesson. Second they come for 30 minutes of centers. They will rotate through six centers designed to provide concrete visual experiences for abstract concepts.
Learn procedures and rules of our artist community.
Learn to manage materials safely and responsibly.
Identify the elements of art (line, color, shape, space) in the environment both inside and outside in nature.
Name qualities of line: straight, curvy, dashed, dotted, short, zig zag, wavy, directional.
Practice using sentences, “I see a red rectangle on the wall.” In the hall, they practice walking in the square spaces and notice the vertical and horizontal lines.
Practice using different kinds of lines, colors, and shapes in their art work.
Use art to express feelings and experiences.
Begin to create identifiable representations of objects, animals, and people.
Learn what occurs naturally and what is made by people. Objects that were made by people began as ideas and then became drawings.
Learn how essential art is in every day life.
Learn vocabulary: triangle, circle, square, long, short, corners, edges, sides, back, middle, front, top, bottom.
Use these words to discuss the art of many artists including Klee, Colemeyer, Picasso, and Johnson, along with others.
Respect all creative efforts and never speak ill of anyone’s effort.
Pre-First and First Grade Art

Student artists will:
Review and reinforce rules and procedures for art in the little studio.
Respect all creative efforts and never speak ill of anyone’s effort.
Discuss the difference between portraits and self-portraits. “A self-portrait is a picture I make of myself.”
Create a full body likeness doing something they really enjoy. They look at and talk about famous artwork showing portraits and self-portraits.
Practice neatness in their work so that it reflects care and effort as well as involvement and joy in the process.
Use crayons, water color, tempera, paper, and scissors to spontaneously include the elements of art: line, color, value, shape, form, texture, and space.
Clean up time continues to be an essential life skill. Children love organizing materials and take pride in managing their work area also. They leave it ready for the next class.
Talk about illustrators and see various examples. The children illustrate selected stories and see that stories and pictures share many common elements, i.e. setting, characters, theme, details.
Practice neatness as they outline to make the edges darker, color in one direction, stay within their outlines, and fill in all the space.
Become more confident in using art to express their thoughts, feelings, and ideas.
Second Grade Art

Student artists will:
Move to the big art studio where they are given more opportunities to exercise self-control.
Reinforce previous learning.
Respect all creative efforts and never speak ill of anyone’s effort.
Create original works of art using personal thoughts, feelings, and ideas.
Gain confidence in trying new techniques, skills, and processes.
Draw extra large self-portraits where they can include lots of details, self-correct, and observe improvement.
Work neatly by outlining their shapes, coloring in one direction, filling all the space, and staying inside their own outlines. They will also use their scissor skills to cut out art work.
Discuss famous artwork and the artists.
Learn the symbolism of the American flag and the meaning and history of other patriotic symbols.
Explore sculpture as the children use cylinders and rectangular prisms to make inventive forms. Learn the difference between a shape and a form as they transform shapes into forms. They will learn the three dimensions (height, width, depth) of the term 3D.
Practice care in using art supplies and participate responsibly in clean up.
Third Grade Art

Student artists will continue to:
Respect all creative efforts and never speak ill of anyone’s effort.
Use and maintain materials and space responsibly and cooperatively contribute to clean up and monitor peers.
Develop their understanding of the art elements (line, color, value, shape, form, texture, and space) both in their discussion of master works and in their own art products.
Review previous learning and practice to incorporate concepts and vocabulary.
Study Red Grooms for inspiration for their 3-D self-portraits.
Practice dividing space to create a pleasing composition.
Use skill and care in cutting and gluing to establish good craftsmanship.
Observe themselves to accurately represent their faces and hands holding a favorite object.
Develop understanding that space is divided into background, middle ground, and foreground.
Use color intuitively and consider different combinations and their relationship on the color wheel.
Expand understanding of the role art plays in the creation of all man made objects and environments.
Plan for an art project to support an altruistic cause.
Students are encouraged to visit Frist Center for the Visual Arts. (Children are free.) This community resource is invaluable in providing a well rounded education. Please consider an outing to the Frist Center for the Visual Arts.

Fourth Grade Art

Student artists will:
Currently at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts is an excellent collection of American 1950-1975 paintings. On September 12, fourth grade students will have a unique opportunity to view a rare representation of this art movement. Besides a docent led tour, students will have a studio experience led by Frist educators. We are so fortunate to have this exceptional educational resource so close. Students always attend free at the Frist and are encouraged to take their parents to see and to create art.

In the Liberty studio, we will create various types of art to prepare for our visit and to reinforce the experience upon our return. Students will observe many samples of these master works before exploring techniques similar to those used by the artists. Pouring and staining paint will help students appreciate how the artists managed the media to produce stunning results. Color is a prime element. Color will be used to express emotion, communicate ideas, and provide a powerful impact.

Students will continue to maintain excellence in their work habits and self control. They are expected to use materials responsibly as well as creatively. Craftsmanship is further emphasized. They are given the opportunity to title their work and write narratives. They also practice self-assessment to guide their own artistic development.

Respect for their work and that of others is always required.

Kindergarten
Art involves process skills that engage students in decision-making, problem solving, and management.

During this learning period students will:
~learn rainbow order
~practice primary and secondary colors
~know how secondary colors are created
~create a color wheel
~practice making, utilizing, and naming a variety of lines
~gain competence in using scissors
~practice symmetry with folded paper
~learn to use water color paint
~review and practice placement of facial features
~continue to discuss works of art
~gain confidence in self expression

Pre First and First Grade
Art involves process skills that engage students in decision-making, problem solving, and management.

During this learning period students will:
~name and apply lines in creating shapes, textures, patterns, and direction
~master basic weaving skills while using color to create patterns
~respond to the elements of art (line, shape, form, texture, color, and space)
~become more aware of their art heritage and art in their everyday lives.
~view and discuss reproductions of original works of art
~use art vocabulary to discuss art
~develop awareness of natural and man made objects as inspiration of art.
~increase skill and comfort in using more art materials.

 

Second Grade
Art involves process skills that engage students in decision-making, problem solving, and management.

During this learning period students will:
~Increase their observation skills
~Begin to identify art created by different cultures
~Explore, experiment, and gain comfort with a variety of materials
~Produce art with a variety of themes, symbols, and subject matter
~view and discuss reproductions of original works of art
~use art vocabulary to discuss art
~develop awareness of natural and man made objects as inspiration of art.
~gain experience with Western art as it represents space in foreground, middle ground, and background
~practice respect for art that is different from their own and to learn the value of being different.

Third Grade
Art involves process skills that engage students in decision-making, problem solving, and management.

During this learning period students will:
~Use art to express personal meaning
~practice craftsmanship to take an idea from concept to completion
~explore symmetry as a type of balance that is different from identical
~produce art using imagination, memory, and observation
~begin to understand the principles of design
~use the elements of art in discussion art work
~produce art that involves value, positive and negative space.
~continue memorizing the elements of art and their meanings

Fourth Grade
Art involves process skills that engage students in decision-making, problem solving, and management.

During this learning period students will:
~demonstrate skill in using a digital camera as an art tool to apply the elements of art (color, value, line, form, shape, texture) and some of the principles of art.
~understand composition is the effective organization of the elements of art.
~continue learning more about China, its art and its influence past, present, and future.
~experiment with tools and materials and demonstrate beginning levels of craftsmanship.
~recognize that many careers involve art knowledge and skills
~continue to use art vocabulary to analyze works of art.
~understand that aesthetic values of art change over time

Creating art has the unique ability to stimulate brain development (Eric Jensen, 2000). Art is also a powerful carrier of information and influence. Children who are exposed at a young age to significant works of art are more likely to remain open minded, creative, and tolerant of the differences that make our country great. By discussing art from around the globe and across time, they will see the impact visual symbols have on individuals and cultures. Then as they create their own work, they too will be open to the exciting new possibilities of sharing their thoughts, feelings, and ideas.

Kindergarten

Increase their understanding of materials.
Experiment and gain control using watercolor.
Engage in creative problem solving.
Learn how and why others create art.
Understand that art has personal meaning to the creator.
Discuss works of art.
Use the elements of art: line, color, value, and shape.
Learn the colors of the rainbow and spectrum in order.
Learn primary and secondary colors and their relationship.
Learn the color wheel.
Use tools safely and properly.
Gain more control when cutting with scissors.
Learn to maintain their work space.
Gain understanding of the importance of art in everyday life.
Demonstrate caring of art work created by themselves and others.

Pre-First Grade

Follow two stage directions without multiple repeat of instructions.
Practice routines with less coaching.
Participate in behavior tracking to improve listening skills.
Practice listening and discussion skills, taking turns, and attending to the speaker.
Gain comfort in using materials.
Develop a sense of personal responsibility for work space.
Produce original art from imaginations, memory, and observation.
Practice personal responsibility and self control.
Show responsibility for maintaining workspace.
Use art to demonstrate understanding of space and planets.
Make connection to other subject matters and art.
Use creative thinking to solve problems.
Create art from experience and imagination.

First Grade

Reinforce collage skills with illustration of a winter scene.
Learn how artists use overlapping to create the illusion of space.
Explore and practice overlapping to illustrate distance in space.
Observe how artists illustrate books.
Observe the structure of trees without “Y” leaves.
Practice drawing from observation.
Review watercolor management.
Relate Dr. Seuss and Vincent Van Gogh with drawing shoes and still lifes.
Review symmetry with free drawing of hearts and cutting to layers. Talk about Valentines and symbols.
Introduce Henri Rousseau, his life in Paris, and his love of the exotic.
Observe African animals and their habitats. Talk about artistic interpretation.
Continue caring actions towards others’ materials and art production.
Reinforce rainbow order, primary and secondary, warm and cool.
Experiment with new tools and processes.

Second Grade

Learn from observation and practicing drawing objects in different spaces: background, middle ground, and foreground.
Review and refine understanding of landscapes as a type of art.
Observe winter tree structures.
Use “Y” trees in winter landscapes.
Use placement on the paper to represent objects in space.
Learn that “space” is an element of art.
Study African animals from various sources.
Apply understanding of natural and fantasy in color choices.
Draw African animals.
Introduce organic as a type of shape.
Explore African textiles as part of African American culture awareness.
Use tempera paint to create a light tinted background in random, organic shapes.
Paint borders of painting in pure colors.
Draw favorite African animal and habitat with oil pastels.
Explore mixed media.
Create original works of art that reflect awareness of other cultures.

Third Grade

Explore painting hand built clay sculptures.
Experiment and gain control using ceramic underglazes and glaze.
Explore positive and negative space, outside the object and inside the object. Investigate how artists use this.
Explore Pablo Picasso’s vases and faces.
Create positive and negative space in art work. Apply and maintain symmetry.
Review the color wheel: primary and secondary, warm and cool colors.
Discuss complementary colors.
Explore symmetrical balance.
Learn from the adventure of a cutting line. Flip without rotating.
Apply symmetry to mask making. Cutting to achieve symmetry.
Use knowledge of art elements in discussions.
Show responsibility in maintaining the work area.
Demonstrate respect for the work of others.
Practice caring for feelings, work , and property.

Fourth Grade

Review self portraits and their importance historically as records of change.
Complete chalk portraits.
Explore the importance of light.
Review the spectrum and differences between light and pigment.
Introduce basic origami with rainbow star folding.
Stress craftsmanship and finishing techniques.
Discuss the place of the artist, artisan, and designer in using art in utilitarian items.
Relate to current Frist Center for the Visual Arts and every day functional objects.
Experiment with illustrating still lifes.
Practice contour and gesture drawing.
Work to enhance observation skills.
Practice observing and drawing from life (representational art).

Kindergarten

Improve skills and gain confidence in handling scissors, paint, crayons, markers, and glue.
Expand their personal self image and understanding of illustrating people.
Reinforce correct vocubulary use and concept understanding of long, short, top, bottom, middle, fold, line, color, value, texture, space, form, space, shape and position prepositions.
Reinforce learning of primary and secondary colors, color mixing, the rainbow, and color wheel.
Practice using art vocabulary when viewing and discussing art masterpieces.
Further reinforce symmetry and folding paper.
Explore the use of symbols and signs to communicate ideas and feeling.
Explore the relationship of objects and space by arranging objects in space.
Demonstate originality in selection and arrangement of images in persaonl art work.
Use images to tell picture stories.
Continue to explore art techniques and processes.
Begin to explore how artists make art.

Pre First and First Grade

The frequent use of art media and tools foster a comprehensive knowledge of the visual arts. This will facilitate even greater breath of knowledge as art integrates content with other subjects.
Recognize the visual characteristics of the design elements (line, color, value, shape, exture,and space) in forms that are natural and of human origin
Spontaneously use the underlying principles of structures e.g. repetition, rhythm, and balance in their art work.
Observe that objects look different under varying conditions, such as ligt, position, motion, and relative size relationships
Describe perceptions of variety in the visual and tactile elements of works of art, nature, and objects in the envirnoment.
Describe ideas and feelings when observing the visual and tactile qualities in works of art, nature, and objects within the total environment.
Discuss impressions of works of art, nature, events, and objects.

Second Grade

Describe works of art, nature, and other objects within the total envirnoment.
Describe some ways pictures, objects, and the environment may be organized.
Identify media (paint, clay, wood, metal, stone) used in creating works of art and other forms.
Describe how a work of art makes you feel.
Look at two artworks of similar style or media and recognize that the two works are not identical.
Look at two artworks of the same subject and discuss general similarities and differences in the pieces.
Look at art reproductions and original artworks and discuss similarities and differences.
Create art works that reflect learning to see and understand visual art learning.

Third Grade

Identify themes and some of the symbols that different cultures use to portray common themes.
Describe a variety of visual art forms, using the vocabulary of visual arts media.
Recognize work produced by individual artists.
Identify artworks of the same style from a group of artworks.
Describe ways that people are involved in the visual arts within a community, including artists, patrons, curators, and gallery owners.
Recognize selected works of art from a variety of world cultures.
Explore the universality of masks and demonstrate symmetry during mask making.

Fourth Grade

Demonstrate ability to arrange objects in space.
Demonstrate ability to design by using overlapping shapes, variation in lines, colors, sizes, and textures to work with such design principles as balance, dominance, and repetition.
Know that visual arts have both a history and specific relationship to various cultures.
Make connections between the visual arts and other disciplines.
Demonstrate how history, culture, and the visual arts can influence each other in making and studying works of art.
Improve drawing skills with contour drawing experiences.
Understand that careers in the visual arts exist and hat artists use knowledge to create works of art and objects used in everyday living.
Recognize how artists use colors in different ways.
Recognize shapes as organic and geometric.
Reflect on how understanding art elements promotes positive change in student work.

Music

art

Jessica Reeves

Objectives

Fourth grade
Rhythmic learning:
Prepare and present 4 even sounds on 1 beat (4 16th notes)
Practice with an ostinato of 8th notes for simple meter songs
Practice an ostinato of triplets for compound meter songs
Review dotted quarter and eighth note patterns
Notate and read these patterns

Melodic learning:

Review do pentatonic scale
Notate, read, and play songs in the do pentatonic scale

Third grade
Rhythmic learning:
Prepare the dotted quarter and eighth note patterns
Prepare the eighth, quarter, eighth note pattern
Present standard musical terms for quarter, eighth, and half notes
Review the tie

Melodic learning:
Review the basic pentatone
Prepare low la and low so
Present low la

Second grade
Rhythmic learning:
Prepare the tie and half note
Prepare 6/8 and 4/4 meter
Present stepping songs with definition
Review rhythms of first grade
Review beat, accent and 2/4 meter

Melodic learning:
Review la-so-mi patterns from first grade
Prepare do and re
Present do
First grade
Rhythmic learning:
Prepare beat, accent, and rhythm
Present beat
Practice beat

Melodic learning:
Prepare higher and lower pitches (so-mi)
Pre-first grade
Rhythmic learning:
Experience steady beat and rhythm through a review of the material from kindergarten
Apply steady beat and rhythm using unpitched percussion instruments and movement

Melodic learning:
Experience a variety of tonalities using materials from kindergarten
Apply melodic principles through exploration of the singing voice
Kindergarten
Rhythmic learning:

Experience steady beat and rhythm through a variety of chants and songs using duple and compound meters
Apply steady beat and rhythm using unpitched percussion instruments and movement using chants and songs in duple and compound meters

Melodic learning:
Experience a variety of tonalities using songs with and without words

Fourth grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present symbols for 2 sixteenths and an eighth note and
an eighth and 2 sixteenths
Present the meter sign for 6/8
Notate, read, and improvise using sixteenth notes

Melodic learning:
Present fa
Present whole steps and half steps

Vocabulary: quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note, meter sign, tempo

Third grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present the whole note
Present the meter sign for 2/4 and 4/4
Present the upbeat

Melodic learning:
Present low so
Notate and read songs with low so and low la

ocabulary: quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note, whole note, tempo

Second grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present galloping songs (6/8)
Review stepping songs and galloping songs
Conduct 2/4 and 6/8 both in two

Melodic learning:
Present re
Practice songs using mi-re-do

vocabulary: steady beat, rhythm, accent, tempo

First grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present the ten patterns for first grade

Melodic learning:
Prepare so and me

Vocabulary: steady beat, rhythm, accent

Pre-first grade

Explore rhythm and melody using creative dramatics and play
Continue building a repertoire for concepts taught in first grade

Vocabulary: resting tone

Kindergarten
Continue to explore rhythm and melody using creative dramatics and play.
Continue building a repertoire for concepts taught in first grade.

Pre-first grade
Continue to explore rhythm and melody using creative dramatics and play.

First grade
Rhythmic learning
Present rhythm patterns 7-10. Present ostinati (l Z l Z) and (l l l Z).
Melodic learning
Present sol and mi on the staff and with hand signs.
Construct sol- mi phrases on the full staff.

Second grade
Rhythmic learning
Present the tie and the half note. Conduct in 2/4 and 6/8 meter. Read rhythms with half notes.

Melodic learning
Read mi-re-mi and do-re-do patterns. Read, notate, and improvise with mi, re, and do.

Third grade
Rhythmic learning
Present the dotted quarter and eighth note pattern. Conduct songs with upbeats in 2/4 and 4/4 meter. Present the eighth-quarter-eighth pattern.

Melodic learning
Read and notate songs with low la and low sol. Improvise using low sol, low la, and do. notate, read, and improvise using all known intervals of the extended pentatonic scale.

Fourth Grade
Rhythmic learning
Present 3/4 meter. Read, notate, and compose songs in 6/8 meter.

Melodic learning
Practice singing the major scale from do to sol.
Present Bb in the key of F. Construct scales in various keys.

Kindergarten
Continue to explore rhythm and melody using creative dramatics and play.
Continue building a repertoire for concepts taught in first grade.

Pre-first grade
Continue to explore rhythm and melody using creative dramatics and play.

First grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present 2/4 meter, measure, and bar lines.

Melodic learning:
Present la in the so, la, so, mi pattern.

Second grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present 4/4 meter derived from accented beats.
Practice conducting 4/4 meter.
Present separated eighth notes.
Melodic learning:
Notate and read songs with all the notes in the basic pentatone.

Third grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present compound duple meter patterns.
Read songs in compound duple meter.

Melodic learning:
Present high do.

Fourth grade
Rhythmic learning:
Present 3/4 meter in songs beginning with an upbeat.

Melodic learning:
Present ti as lower than do and higher than la.
Construct scales using the upper tetrachord.

Physical Education

art

Charity Rice

Hannah Shong

Melissa Stillings

Objectives

Kindergarten
The fundamental objective of the kindergarten physical education program is to help prepare the child for the classroom. The SMART Program, (Stimulating Maturity through Accelerated Readiness Training), takes place daily. Stations are set up to work on different developmental areas. These include balance, fine motor, large motor, vestibular, and vision.

Activities in the nine weeks will include:
* Spinning
* Crawling
* Creeping
* Skipping
* Galloping
* Balance
* Eye-hand coordination activities
* Balls
* Education gymnastics
* Rhythms
* Climbing
* Visual activities

1st and 2nd grade
The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills, physical fitness and sportsmanship.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts
Students in 1st and 2nd grade will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics. The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:
* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements (short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing
Activities for the 1st nine weeks:
*orientation
*nutrition
*fitness training and testing
*skating
*underhand toss
*large group games

3rd & 4th grades
The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills and physical fitness.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts

Students in grades 3 & 4 will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics. The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:
* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements (short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing

Activities for the 1st nine weeks:
* large group games
* playground games
*fitness training/fitness testing
*volleyball
*nutrition

Kindergarten

The fundamental objective of the kindergarten physical education program is to help prepare the child for the classroom.  The SMART Program, (Stimulating Maturity through Accelerated Readiness Training), takes place daily. Stations are set up to work on different developmental areas.  These include balance, fine motor, large motor, vestibular, and vision.

Activities in the nine weeks will include:
Spinning
Crawling
Creeping
Skipping
Galloping
Balance
Eye-hand coordination activities
Balls
Education gymnastics
Rhythms
Climbing
Visual activities

First and Second Grade

The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills and physical fitness.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts
Students in grades 1 & 2 will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics.  The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:

* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements
(short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing

Activities for the 2nd nine weeks:
* soccer skills
* climbing ropes/wall
* juggling
* skating
* bowling

Third and Fourth Grade

The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills and physical fitness.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts
Students in grades 3 & 4 will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics.  The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:

* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements
(short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing

Activities for the 2nd nine weeks:
*skating
*climbing wall/ropes
*soccer
*juggling
* bowling

Kindergarten

The fundamental objective of the kindergarten physical education program is to help prepare the child for the classroom. The SMART Program, (Stimulating Maturity through Accelerated Readiness Training), takes place daily. Stations are set up to work on different developmental areas. These include balance, fine motor, large motor, vestibular, and vision.

Activities in the nine weeks will include:
* Spinning
* Crawling
* Creeping
* Skipping
* Galloping
* Balance
* Eye-hand coordination activities
* Balls
* Education gymnastics
* Rhythms
* Climbing
* Visual activities

1st & 2nd grade

The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills, physical fitness and sportsmanship.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts

Students in first grade will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics. The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:
* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements (short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing
Activities for the 3rd nine weeks:
*balance stations
* long jump rope
* short jump rope
* gymnastics
* basketball skills
* heart activities

*parachute

*cupstacking

3rd & 4th grades

The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills, physical fitness and sportsmanship.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts
Students in grades 3 and 4 will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics. The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:
* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements
(short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing
Activities for the 3rd nine weeks:
* basketball skills
* gymnastics
* heart activities
* hockey/cooperative activities
* fitness
* rhythms

*balance

*cup stacking

Kindergarten

The fundamental objective of the kindergarten physical education program is to help prepare the child for the classroom. The SMART Program, (Stimulating Maturity through Accelerated Readiness Training), takes place daily. Stations are set up to work on different developmental areas. These include balance, fine motor, large motor, vestibular, and vision.

Activities in the nine weeks will include:
* Spinning
* Crawling
* Creeping
* Skipping
* Galloping
* Balance
* Eye-hand coordination activities
* Balls
* Education gymnastics
* Rhythms
* Climbing
* Visual activities

1st & 2nd grade

The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills and physical fitness.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts
Students in grades 1 and 2 will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics. The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:
* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements (short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing
Activities for the 4th nine weeks:
* blance
* hockey
* running – mile run
* fitness testing
* dribbling
* square dance/folk dance

*parachute

*field day

*stations

3rd & 4th grades

The fundamental objective of the physical education program is to provide opportunities for the development of motor skills and physical fitness.

Skill Themes and Fitness Concepts
Students in grades 3 and 4 will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness development, including educational games, educational dance, and educational gymnastics. The following motor skills and fitness concepts are included:
* body awareness
* balancing
* chasing, fleeing, dodging
* kicking and punting
* striking with implements (short and long handled)
* rolling
* throwing and catching
* traveling
* volleying and dribbling
* transferring weight
* jumping and landing
* cardiorespiratory endurance
* flexibility
* muscular strength and endurance
* fitness testing
Activities for the 4th nine weeks:
* rhythms
* balance
* stations
* running – mile run
* fitness testing
* outdoor activities
* hockey

*parachute

*field day

Spanish

art

Pam Volk

Objectives

Kindergarten and Pre-1st
During the first quarter, the kindergarten classes and pre-1st will complete a unit, “Talking About Myself”. In this unit the students will learn:
1. to greet others
2. to respond to greetings
3. to introduce self
4. to ask name of others
5. to say goodbye
6. to describe own feelings

1st Grade
During the first quarter, the first grade classes will complete a unit, “Talking About Myself”. In this unit, the students will learn:
l. to greet others
2. to respond to greetings
3. to introduce self
4. to ask names of others
5. to say goodbye
6. to describe own feelings
7. to ask feelings of others
8. to state age
9. to ask age of others

2nd Grade
During the 1st quarter, the second grade classes will complete a unit, “Talking About Myself”. In this unit, the students will learn:
l. to greet others
2. to respond to greetings
3. to introduce self
4. to ask names of others
5. to say goodbye
6. to describe own feelings
7. to ask feelings of others
8. to state age
9. to ask age of others
10. to use numbers from 0-20

3rd Grade
During the 1st quarter, the third grade classes will complete a unit, “Talking About Myself”. In this unit, the students will learn:
l. to greet others
2. to respond to greetings
3. to introduce self
4. to ask names of others
5. to say goodbye
6. to describe own feelings
7. to ask feelings of others
8. to state age
9. to ask age of others
10. to use numbers from 0-39

4th Grade
During the 1st quarter, the fourth grade classes will complete a unit, “Talking About Myself”. In this unit the students will learn:
l. to greet others
2. to respond to greetings
3. to introduce self
4. to ask names of others
5. to say goodbye
6. to describe own feelings
7. to ask feelings of others
8. to state age
9. to ask age of others
10. to use numbers from 0-59

Family, Food and Fiestas Note: Children having previous knowledge of Spanish will complete the following Learning Objectives and will explore additional content material based on their background knowledge of the Spanish language.

Fourth Grade

La famlia (family):

1. Using appropriate Spanish vocabulary, identify members of their immediate and extended family and place them on a genealogical chart. Identify specific Spanish language structures that identify gender.

2. Greet family members using formal and informal language appropriately.

3. Ask and answer questions about family members, i.e. how many, how old they are and their names. Review numbers to 40.

4. Be aware of the importance of families in Spanish-speaking cultures, and how the family connections are maintained through regular dinners with the extended family.

La comida (food):

1. Be aware of the Great Exchange- the history of food that we eat, that much of it originated in the New World, and what foods were brought to the New World by European explorers.

2. Identify foods that originated in Latin America, such as tomatoes, chocolate, avocados, pineapple, potatoes and corn. Also be able to tell about the cultural significance of either chocolate or corn.

3. Talk about foods that they like and dislike. Be able to use please (pro favor) and thank you (gracias) appropriately.

4. Plan a meal for a special occasion; including 4 items that are of Latin American origin.

5. Identify the items of a table setting- silverware, plate, glass, and napkin.

6. Be aware of restaurants in their community that serve Latin American foods. Whenever possible, students are encourage to use knowledge of language when ordering food.

Las fiestas (celebrations):

1. Be aware of the most important celebrations in Latin America and why they are celebrated.

2. Be able to say holiday greetings using appropriate Spanish language.

3. Recognize music and decorations related to a major holiday and be able to make items related to it (papel picado, greeting cards using appropriate language.)

4. Compare holidays that celebrations in Latin America with how similar ones are celebrated in the United States. Be able to identify specific similarities and differences.

5. Be aware of Spanish cultural celebrations that occur in their community and that they can participate in them. Students will be encouraged to attend events and use their knowledge of language and culture to enhance enjoyment of celebration.

Third Grade

La famlia (family):

1. Using appropriate Spanish vocabulary, identify members of their immediate and some of the extended family and place them on a genealogical chart. Identify specific Spanish language structures that identify gender.

2. Greet family members using formal and informal language appropriately.

3. Ask and answer questions about the names of the members of their family.

4. Say how old the people in their family are. Review numbers to 40. 5. Be aware of the importance of families in Spanish-speaking cultures, and how the family connections are maintained through regular dinners with the extended family.

La comida (food):

1. Be aware of the Great Exchange- the history of food that we eat, that much of it originated in the New World, and what foods were brought to the New World by European explorers.

2. Identify 4 foods that originated in Latin America, such as tomatoes, chocolate, avocados, pineapple, potatoes and corn. Also be able to tell about the cultural significance of corn.

3. Talk about foods that they like and dislike. Plan a meal for a special occasion; including 3 items that are of Latin American origin. Be able to use please (pro favor) and thank you (gracias) appropriately.

4. Identify some items of a table setting- silverware, plate. 5. Be aware of restaurants in their community that serve Latin American foods. Whenever possible, students are encourage to use knowledge of language when ordering food.

Las fiestas (celebrations):

1. Be aware of two important celebrations in Latin America and why they are celebrated.

2. Recognize music and decorations related to a major holiday and be able to make items related to it (papel picado, greeting cards using appropriate language.)

3. Be able to say holiday greetings using appropriate Spanish language.

4. Compare holidays that celebrations in Latin America with how similar ones are celebrated in the United States. Be able to identify specific similarities and differences.

5. Be aware of Spanish cultural celebrations that occur in their community and that they can participate in them. Students will be encouraged to attend events and use their knowledge of language and culture to enhance enjoyment of celebration.

Second Grade

La famlia (family):

1. Using appropriate Spanish vocabulary, identify members of their immediate family and some of the extended family and place them on a genealogical chart.

2. Be aware of formal and informal language in greetings and when to use it appropriately with different family members.

3. Respond to questions about the names of the specific people in their families.

4. Say how old their brothers and sisters are. Review numbers to 15. 5. Be aware of the importance of families in Spanish-speaking cultures, and how the children are taken care of by the extended family and even the neighborhood.

La comida (food):

1. Be aware that many of cultural/food exchange that occurred between Europe and the New World. Identify 4 foods that we eat which originated in the New World, and two foods were brought to the New World by European explorers.

2. Talk about foods that they like and dislike. Plan a meal for a special occasion; including 3 items that are of Latin American origin. Be able to use please (pro favor) and thank you (gracias) appropriately.

3. Identify some items of a table setting- silverware, plate.

4. Be aware of restaurants in their community that serve Latin American foods. Whenever possible, students are encourage to use knowledge of language when ordering food.

Las fiestas (celebrations):

1. Be aware of two important celebrations in Latin America.

2. Recognize music and decorations related to a major holiday and be able to make items related to it (such as papel picado, greeting cards using appropriate language.)

3. Identify a holiday that is celebrations in both Latin America and the United States. Be able to identify some similarities and differences.

4. Be able to say holiday greetings using appropriate Spanish language.

5. Be aware of Spanish cultural celebrations that occur in their community and that they can participate in them. Students will be encouraged to attend events and use their knowledge of language and culture to enhance enjoyment of celebration.

First Grade

La famlia (family):

1. Using appropriate Spanish vocabulary, identify members of their immediate family and place them on a genealogical chart.

2. Respond to questions about how many people are in their families.

3. Say how old their brothers and sisters are. Review numbers to 10. 4. Be aware of the importance of families in Spanish-speaking cultures, and how the children are taken care of by the extended family and even the neighborhood.

La comida (food):

1. Identify 4 foods that we eat which originated in the New World.

2. Talk about foods that they like and dislike. Plan a meal for a special occasion; including 3 items that are of Latin American origin.

3. Be able to use please (pro favor) and thank you (gracias) appropriately.

4. Identify some items of a table setting- silverware, plate.

5. Be aware of restaurants in their community that serve Latin American foods.

Las fiestas (celebrations):

1. Be aware of two important celebrations in Latin America.

2. Listen to music and stories connected to an holiday that is celebrated in Latin America.

3. Participate in making items that are related to a major holiday (papel picado, greeting cards using appropriate language.)

4. Be able to say holiday greetings using appropriate Spanish language.

5. Be aware of Spanish cultural celebrations that occur in their community and that they can participate in them.

Kindergarten

La famlia (family):

1. Using appropriate Spanish vocabulary, identify members of their immediate family.

2. Say how old they are and one other sibling. Review numbers to 10.

3. Be aware of the importance of families in Spanish-speaking cultures, and how the children are taken care of by the extended family and even the neighborhood.

La comida (food):

1. Identify 3 foods that we eat which originated in the New World.

2. Talk about foods that they like and dislike.

3. Be able to use please (pro favor) and thank you (gracias) appropriately.

4. Be aware of restaurants in their community that serve Latin American foods.

Las fiestas (celebrations):

1. Be aware of two important celebrations in Latin America.

2. Listen to music and stories connected to an holiday that is celebrated in Latin America.

3. Participate in making an item that is related to a major holiday-i.e. greeting cards using appropriate language.)

4. Be able to say holiday greetings using appropriate Spanish language.

5. Be aware of Spanish cultural celebrations that occur in their community and that they can participate in them.

Kindergarten and Pre-1st
During the third quarter, the kindergarten and pre-1st classes will complete a unit, “My Family”. In this unit the students will learn to:
1. name the members of the family
2. tell the names of the family members
3. tell how many boys, girls, etc. are in the family
4. recognize a family member from an oral description
1st Grade
During the third quarter, the 1st graders will complete 2 units: “ My Family” and “ Classroom Objects”. In these units, the students will learn to:
1. name the members of the family
2. tell the names of the family members
3. tell how many boys, girls, brothers, sisters, etc. are in the family
4. recognize a family member from an oral description
5. name 12 classroom objects
6. recognize the classroom objects from an oral description
7. tell how many of each classroom object are in the classroom
8. tell the color of each classroom object

2nd Grade
During the third quarter, the 2nd graders will complete 2 units: “My Family” and “Classroom Objects”. In these units, the students will learn to:
1. name the members of the family
2. tell the names of the family members
3. tell how many boys, girls, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, etc. are in the family
4. recognize a family member from an oral description
5. name 15 classroom objects
6. recognize the classroom objects from an oral description
7. tell how many of each classroom object are in the classroom
8. tell the color of each classroom object

3rd Grade
During the third quarter, the 3rd graders will complete 2 units: “My Family” and “Classroom Objects”. In these units, the students will learn to:
1. name the members of the family
2. tell the names of the family members
3. tell how many boys, girls, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, grandmothers, grandfathers, etc. are in the family
4. recognize a family member from an oral description
5. name 18 classroom objects
6. recognize the classroom objects from an oral description
7. tell how many of each classroom object are in the classroom
8. tell the color of each classroom object

4th Grade
During the third quarter, the 4th graders will complete 2 units: “My Family” and “Classroom Objects”. In these units, the students will learn to:
1. name the members of the family
2. tell the names of the family members
3. tell how many boys, girls, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, grandmothers, grandfathers, cousins, etc. are in the family
4. recognize a family member from an oral description
5. use possessive adjectives with family members
6. name 20 classroom objects
7. recognize the classroom objects from an oral description
8. tell how many of each classroom object are in the classroom
9. to tell the color of each classroom object

Kindergarten and Pre-1st
During the fourth quarter, the kindergarten and pre-1st classes will complete a unit, “My Favorite Foods”. In this unit the students will learn:
l. to name seven foods
2. to name the color of the food
3. to name what food/drink they are eating/drinking
4. to name what food/drink they want to eat/drink

1st Grade
During the fourth quarter, the 1st grade classes will complete a unit, “My Favorite Foods”. In this unit the students will learn:
l. to name 14 foods
2. to name the color of the food
3. to name what food/drink they are eating/drinking
4. to name what food/drink they want to eat/drink

2nd Grade
During the fourth quarter, the 2nd grade classes will complete a unit, “My Favorite Foods”. In this unit the students will learn:
l. to name 16 foods
2. to name the color of the food/drink
3. to name what food/drink they are eating/drinking
4. to name what food/drink they want to eat/drink

3rd Grade
During the fourth quarter, the 3rd grade classes will complete a unit, “My Favorite Foods”. In this unit the students will learn:
l. to name 18 foods
2. to name the color of the food/drink
3. to name what food/drink they are eating/drinking
4. to name what food/drink they want to eat/drink
5. to name what food/drink they like

4th Grade
During the fourth quarter, the 4th grade classes will complete a unit, “My Favorite Foods”. In this unit the students will learn:
l. to name 30 foods
2. to name the objects for a table setting
3. to name the color of the food/drink
4. to name what food/drink they are eating/drinking
5. to name what food/drink they want to eat/drink
6. to name what food/drink they like